Web & Graphic Design

Category Archives: Lessons learned from working with clients

Why i finally gave up on stock photo agencies

A few years ago, back when microstock agencies were still relatively in their infancy boasting “only” 1-2 millions photos, i decided to join such a service as a contributor. At the time, i naively believed in the “get rich fast by selling your content” scheme. Armed with a bridge camera which spit out files you would get today with any average mobile phone i set out on a mission to conquer the world of online photography. Several dozen rejections later, with only two [...] Continue

Why i should have canceled this website redesign project

Last autumn, we were approached by a multinational company to redesign their website. At the time, taking the project felt like a good idea: it came as a recommendation from an acquaintance, those in charge seemed like nice people and the tight deadline felt like another proof they were determined to work with us in developing a modern online presence. I also liked the fact they prided themselves on being professionals who treasure honesty and good work ethics. About a half a year later and [...] Continue

Feedback, communication and respect during a design contest

One of the most frustrating aspects of participating in online design contests is receiving little or no feedback at all. There’s no point to single out a certain website, because you’ll get to see the same pattern, whichever one you browse. Once you go past certain guidelines, which let’s face it, are mostly empty words published to inflate some corporate egos and project a spit polished aura of false empathy, it boils down to the type of human beings that interact within [...] Continue

Tips on writing a professional brief for your design contest

In the last post on how to maximize the efficiency of your design contests, I’ve wrote about deciding what is the right amount of money for the winning design. Once you’ve gotten over establishing a prize, the next step is to provide a detailed and professional brief. A poorly written or incomplete documentation is a sure way to alienate designers, as they usually perceive it as forebearer of wasted time and confusing tasks. If a significant amount of essential data is missing, [...] Continue

Tips for choosing the right prize while running a design contest

Just because most designers fancy themselves somewhere in the back of their minds as promising artists, doesn’t mean they should have to work the way struggling painters of past centuries used to. Unlike a musician or poet, who could turn their problems into great songs, a graphic artist seldom finds working for scraps as a good environment for creativity. Great innovative ideas come when you’re able to distance yourself from the mundane and focus solely on the task at hand. [...] Continue

Running a design contest – tips for first timers

The outcome of every design contest, from the client’s point of view, is picking the most appropriate solution from a significant amount of submissions. It also doesn’t hurt if you can get it at a noticeably lower price than what an advertising agency or high priced design bureau would normally charge. There are two ways to approach this situation: either as a boss or as a businessman. In the first scenario, you would unload all of your everyday frustrations and nastiness on a bunch [...] Continue

Pros and cons of participating in design contests

The very few times when i think about the meaning and purpose of contests in general, i picture them as one-off events where you give your all  for a chance to achieve something you truly desire. They help mobilize your strength and creativity to defeat all other competitors. It’s more or less a battle, which in a perfect world would be entertained with fair-play, but in reality it’s either as cut throat as you can imagine or just plain rigged. Now, have you ever wondered how it [...] Continue

Lessons learned from working with my clients

As a designer working either on web or in print, dealing with clients can be truly frustrating at times. Without enough experience under your belt you won’t be able to spot those hopelessly troubled individuals you’re better off without, maintain the lines of communication open with the ones that don’t share your views or keep close those you’ve enjoyed working with. Just as everything in life, this type of jobs come and go, faster or slower, better or worse. Even more [...] Continue